How to prepare for data collecting in your vineyard

How to prepare for data collecting in your vineyard 1920 1440 Sectormentor for Vines

Monitoring and analysing your vines helps to predict grape yield and when to harvest your grapes to get the highest quality.

 

How many vines should I monitor?

First you need to create a sampling plan which is clear and easy to manage – making sure it’s actually doable is the most important element. If it’s too complicated you are likely to lose patience with it! Research papers recommend you sample 3% of your vineyard, this is the minimum you need to do to get a representative sample for predicting your grape yield.

 

Bride Valley Vineyard

 

Which vines should I monitor?

We recommend proportional stratified sampling: in basic terms this means you need to split your vineyard in smaller somewhat homogeneous blocks. Maybe your vineyard is already naturally broken down, for example you may plant different varieties or clones in blocks in the vineyard, that makes it simple! If you have a large-ish area of vines that significantly under or over performs in comparison to other area you could also define this area as its own block.

If you don’t have anything in place already, don’t worry, think about your number of rows and the number of bays on each row, and draw a simple map of the vineyard, then outline the different blocks of vines that are similar.

Some good questions to ask yourself when determining where each block should be are: when harvesting, what do you measure the yield for, each variety? Each clone? And when doing a specific activity, or yield prediction, does it vary widely depending on variety? Or clone?

 

Oxney Organic Estate Vineyard

 

How do I choose sample sites?

Once you have your blocks defined, you can decide which bays to sample within each block. It is suggested you sample 3% of bays in each block using a systematic method of selecting random samples (systematic sampling). You should always start a few rows in to avoid getting skewed results from the rows on the edge of the vineyard.

When you use Sectormentor For Vines to record data you scan an RFID tag which immediately identifies the sample site you are working in. RFID tags make it simple, because you can attach them directly to the vine supports, and simply scan them when you want to collect data at their location. Each sample site can have it’s own RFID tag.

 

RFID tag at Bride Valley Vineyard

 

What is an example of systematic sampling?

Let’s look at an example setup. Let’s say you have a vineyard split into 2 blocks, based on 2 different clones planted. Each of these blocks is relatively homogeneous. Consider one block, if a block has 30 rows with 20 bays in each row, and each bay has 5 vines. This means there are 100 vines/row. So that is 3000 vines in that block (see diagram below). You plan to sample close to 3% of the vines, then you have to sample 90 vines.

Using systematic sampling, you could pick every 5th row to sample, excluding edges. And if each row has 20 bays, you could have a system across the vineyard of always sampling from the 3rd, 9th and 15th bays. These bays are where you put the RFID tag and start the sampling from.

For efficiency we suggest sampling multiple bays at each location, so in this example you would always sample 3 bays from the tag, so if the tag was at bay 3, then you would use that tag to sample bays 3, 4 and 5.

 

Alternatively you could do systematic sampling across the entire vineyard for example every 4th vine on every 6th row. So you go to every 6th row and sample vines 4, 8, 12, 16, 18, 22 etc along that row. Although this method could potentially be more comprehensive, it can take longer to complete, and may not be manageable for your vineyard. For this method, we recommend putting one RFID tag at the end of the row, so you have sample rows instead of bays. When you scan the RFID tag the Sectormentor For Vines app will automatically remember which row you are on and save the data for all vines along that row.

 

One North Eastern US study states: Crop estimation helps ensure consistent production of high-quality fruit over multiple years in our variable climate. A grape grower who is unable to invest in, or elects to ignore, developing operational competence in crop estimation is likely to be at a competitive disadvantage in tightening markets.”

 

Interested in understanding more about your vines?

Check out our Sectormentor For Vines app which makes data collection in the field simple and easy, as well as analysing trends turning that data into helpful insights at home on your computer. If you have any questions don’t hesitate to get in touch with us: info@vidacycle.com